Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Don’t Ask Who, What, Where, When, Why or How and Don’t Ask Do You Remember


By Marie Marley
Alzheimer's Reading Room

Pink Landscape Alzheimer's Reading Room

When Ed had Alzheimer’s I would often ask him what he had for lunch. Duh. That was stupid. First of all he couldn’t remember what he had for lunch. Second, he couldn’t even remember if he’d had lunch.

He’d always answer that question by saying, “I didn't have lunch.” Then I might say something like, “Did they let you sleep instead of going to lunch?” He couldn't remember that either.

“When am I going to remember not to ask him questions like those?” I’d often ask myself.

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Monday, January 26, 2015

Common Drugs Linked to Higher Dementia Risk


By Alzheimer's Reading Room

Medication -Alzheimer's Reading Room

Older adults should be aware that many medications—including some available without a prescription, such as over-the-counter sleep aids—have strong anticholinergic effects.

Anticholinergic effects happen because some medications block the neurotransmitter called acetylcholine in the brain and body. That can cause many side effects, including drowsiness, constipation, retaining urine, and dry mouth and eyes.

This study links a significantly increased risk for developing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, to taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects at higher doses or for a longer time.

“If providers need to prescribe a medication with anticholinergic effects because it is the best therapy for their patient,
  • they should use the lowest effective dose,
  • monitor the therapy regularly to ensure it’s working,
  • and stop the therapy if it’s ineffective.”
Anticholinergic effects happen because some medications block the neurotransmitter called acetylcholine in the brain and body, she explained. That can cause many side effects, including drowsiness, constipation, retaining urine, and dry mouth and eyes.

Also see - Which Drugs Increase the Risk of Falling for the Elderly



Alzheimer's They Won't Know You


After an incredible outpouring of emotions the caregiver experiences an immediate sense of relief that they are not alone.

By Bob DeMarco
+Alzheimer's Reading Room

In a series of articles I asked Alzheimer's caregiver a simple question that could be defined this way --

Will persons living with Alzheimer's become an empty shell?

Alzheimer's - They Won't Know You

Sunday, January 25, 2015

How Do You Tell Your Kids That You Got Alzheimer's?


By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

How Do You Tell Your Kids That You Got Alzheimer's Alzheimers Reading Room

I am bringing this interview with Greg O'Brien up today because I think it is important. The interview gives you some real insight into a person living with Alzheimer's disease.

The interview is thought provoking, real, and it is likely to cause you to think and feel. If you are patient and listen you are likely to become very emotional. In fact, you might need Kleenex.

In the end, a very important message is being delivered here. There is life after a diagnosis of Alzheimer's, and the person living with Alzheimer's is still alive inside.

Listening will be well worth your time and effort.

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Saturday, January 24, 2015

Alzheimer's Tip Communication and Socialization


My mother was the same person I always knew. She was not a different person. Her brain is sick. She enjoyed many of the things she was doing before Alzheimer's disease.


Alzheimer's Tip Communication and Socialization


For us, communication and socialization went hand in hand.

I am not using the clinical definition of socialization here. Instead, I am describing a continuing process that leads to the establishment of norms of behavior and communication in the Alzheimer's disease environment.

I think most Alzheimer's caregivers understand that the Alzheimer's patient can benefit from being in social settings and engaging in communication.

Sadly, the exact opposite sometimes occurs as the patient and caregiver fall into the black hole of Alzheimer's disease.

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