Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Do Brain Games Really Help Prevent Dementia?


The explosion of individuals with dementia brain draining disorders like Alzheimer’s, has created an over abundance of resources targeted at improving one’s mind.

By Elaine C Pereira
Alzheimer's Reading Room

Do Brain Games Really Help Prevent Dementia

The implied proposition of course, is that challenging your brain through visual, spatial and related problem-solving exercises will stall or maybe even arrest dementia.

But do they?

Like far too many people, I know first hand the ravages of Alzheimer’s. My mother died of the disease in 2011 and she often referred to her “Aunt Elizabeth” has having succumb to “senility, but probably Alzheimer’s”. I never met my great aunt Elizabeth but clearly AD “runs in the family.”

Given my gene pool is probably tainted with documented cases of Alzheimer’s, I’m out to explore every reasonable approach to fighting back! So I thought I’d check a few out “brain games.”

My experiences are just that, my personal experience with no research validity. But as an Occupational Therapist with a strong neurological background, I’m qualified to at least render a professional opinion.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Alzheimer's Care, Self Concept, Self Confidence


When it comes to Alzheimer's caregiving it is very difficult to be positive because at the outset few of us have any concept of what to do.

By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

The self is not something that one finds. It is something that one creates

Self concept, the concept of self.

Self concept defines how you think or feel about yourself. 

Basically, self concept is a determining factor in what you believe you can do; and, what you believe you can't do.

The concept of self is determined by our experiences.

In the case of Alzheimer's caregiving it is very difficult to be positive because at the outset few of us have any concept of what to do.

Alzheimer's Association - 2025 Alzheimer's National Plan Not Likely to Succeed


"Inadequate funding remains the single most important impediment to progress in achieving the research goal of the Alzheimer's National Plan."

By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

Alzheimer's Forget Me Not

The U.S. Government has initiated a major effort to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025. However, a workgroup of nearly 40 Alzheimer's researchers and scientists says the research milestones in the U.S. Government's National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease must be broadened in scope, increased in scale, and adequately funded in order to successfully achieve this goal.

A series of proposals by the work group to enlarge and strengthen the Plan are published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

According to the authors of the newly published article, who include U.S. based academic and industry scientists across all disciplines of Alzheimer's research,
"Many prominent investigators believe the prospect of delaying the onset of disabling symptoms within a decade is an attainable goal, provided we can surmount several scientific, administrative, and most importantly, financial impediments." 
The authors continue,
 "Inadequate funding remains the single most important impediment to progress in achieving the research goal of the National Plan."

Monday, October 20, 2014

Cold Sores (Herpes Simplex Virus) Increase the Risk of Dementia


The only thing I can say is my mother lived with Alzheimer's disease, and she was getting cold sores in her mouth for as long as I could remember. This research indicates there is a connection between cold sores and the risk of dementia.

By Alzheimer's Reading Room

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

Cold Sores (Herpes Simplex Virus) Increase the Risk of Dementia

Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, claim this in two studies in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.
"Our results clearly show that there is a link between infections of herpes simplex virus and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. This also means that we have new opportunities to develop treatment forms to stop the disease," says Hugo Lövheim, associate professor at the Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University