Oct 17, 2017

Alzheimer's Study Reveals Communication Patterns that Sustain Spouse Caregiver Relationships

Married couples affected by Alzheimer's disease often suffer from feelings of isolation, depression and estrangement.


Married couples affected by Alzheimer's disease often suffer from feelings of isolation, depression and estrangement.

When a spouse is cognitively impaired, marital communication is impaired.


As Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progresses, language problems increase in frequency – such as searching for the right word, repeating the same word, asking the same question over and over, or substituting one word for another.

As a result of the decline in communication, married couples affected by Alzheimer's disease suffer isolation, depression and estrangement. Limited research has existed on communication in couples affected by AD and existing research primarily focuses on identifying communication deficits – until now.

The Best Way to Find Solutions to the Problems that Caregivers Face Each Day

Alzheimer's Care, Always Be Kinder Than You Feel

Alzheimer's care is difficult and dementia patients often say things that seem nonsensical to us; or, say things that leave us exasperated, confused, frustrated, and sometimes angry.


Good dementia care requires the virtue of kindness.
By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

What does the above message mean to you?

It is not easy to listen and understand a person with living with Alzheimer's.

Learning how to understand, cope and communicate is important; and, takes time and practice.


You might want to consider reading the following articles which are very popular; and, have been widely shared on our Facebook and Google+ pages.

Oct 15, 2017

Rewiring My Brain and Stepping into Alzheimer's World

Once you start to understand how things work in Alzheimer's World - you get calm and comfortable.


How to use you brain for more effective Alzheimer's care, dementia care, and memory care.
By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

Once you get calm and comfortable you give off a better "vibe" to someone that has Alzheimer's.

Over time as you learn how to understand, cope and communicate with a person living with dementia you will find that instead of being at odds most of time you begin to relate better to each other. Once you start to relate to each other you find that it is much easier to operate in a world filled with Alzheimer's disease.

The key word here is relate.

How to relate to an Alzheimer's Patient


Oct 11, 2017