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Monday, May 10, 2010

Alzheimer's Caregiver Asks for Advice and Suggestions


I am his lifeline to sorting out what confuses him or just to share thoughts.....
By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room


Sharon wrote and asked?
I just joined the Alzheimer's Reading Room and I'm new to blogging in general so bear with me.

I am 55 and the primary caregiver of my father, age 81, who is in the moderate stage of dementia.

Unlike many of the messages I've read elsewhere and on the public page of this blog, my father lives in a wonderful dementia care unit which is basically assisted living with security.

He has a big single room that is set up primarily as a living room with a bed towards the back and his own bathroom. He was in regular assisted living for about 1 1/2 years before making this move for security reasons.

I'm interested in learning from others about how to best respond to dad's time confusion (believes he is living in different periods in his life).

I do not have any where near the stresses of others who are caring for loved ones at home but I'm feeling many of the same feelings of sadness along with wanting to make life as good as possible for dad.

I didn't know if there are others on this blog who have their parents in a dementia care facility and could share how they work successfully with the staff, plan visits to compliment other activities, and deal with the sadness of their parents condition.

I may not see/feel dad all day like the care at home folks but he calls a lot...I am his lifeline to sorting out what confuses him or just to share thoughts.

Are there any tips/suggestions for a caregiver in my situation?


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Bob DeMarco is the editor of the Alzheimer's Reading Room and an Alzheimer's caregiver. Bob has written more than 1,400 articles with more than 9,000 links on the Internet. Bob resides in Delray Beach, FL.


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Original content Bob DeMarco, the Alzheimer's Reading Room