Friday, November 19, 2010

Gender, Race, and Alzheimer's Disease


Women, African-Americans, and Hispanics are statistically more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

+Alzheimer's Reading Room

Women are statistically more likely than men to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. While 16 percent of women over 71 years old develop the degenerative brain disorder, only 11 percent of men of the same age are afflicted with it. That women live longer on average than men may explain this difference, but changes in hormone levels may also play a factor.



Estimated Lifetime Risks for Alzheimer’s by Age and Sex

Research also indicates that in the U.S. African-Americans are about twice as likely—and Hispanics one and a half times more likely—than older whites to get Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. This is becoming a bigger concern than ever, as African-Americans and Hispanics will make up a larger proportion of the U.S. population over the next few decades.

Proportion of Americans Aged 55 and Older with Cognitive Impairment, by Race/Ethnicity, Health and Retirement Study, 2006

Source Big Think

Insight and Advice

Original content +Bob DeMarco , the Alzheimer's Reading Room