Jan 11, 2012

The Brain, Pamela, the Parrot, and Conclusion Leading to Evidence

Alzheimer's does not stop with the patient. It will also try to kill the brain of the Alzheimer's caregiver. I realize kill is a rather strong word. Maybe I should say, it will try to suck the life out of an Alzheimer's caregiver.

By +Bob DeMarco 
+Alzheimer's Reading Room

Alzheimer's Caregiving
Advice and Insight (20 articles)
Previously, we published an article written by Pamela R. Kelley -- Worth A Try – Surprises Await -- Does the Parrot Work?

I was elated when we received this article. To say I was happy would be putting it mildly.

Today, I want to add some color and insight into her terrific article.

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Alzheimer's disease kills brains.

At some point in the disease a person suffering from Alzheimer's can no longer do things we take for granted, like brush their teeth or button a shirt. It only gets worse.

In spite of the above, a simple question remains -- can Alzheimer's patients still feel?

Alzheimer's does not stop with the patient. It will also try to kill the brain of the Alzheimer's caregiver. This is explained in part by the 40 percent of caregivers that eventually suffer from depression. I realize kill is a rather strong word. Maybe I should say, it will try to suck the life out of an Alzheimer's caregiver.

Alzheimer's will try its hardest to make sure it disrupts the wiring in your brain so that you conclude that there is nothing you can do to improve the life of a person suffering from Alzheimer's.

Many Alzheimer's caregivers hear the word "NO" over and over. It comes as no surprise to me that caregivers start saying the words can't and won't all the time; or, start believe that nothing will work for their specific patient. Nothing.

Alzheimer's is taking control of your brain. It is rewiring your brain to think negatively.

Alzheimer's disease chases your family and friends away. Alzheimer's wants you to come to the belief that there is no hope.

Alzheimer's disease wants you to stop living your life.

Alzheimer's will convince you that you can't take an Alzheimer's patient out to eat because they will eat with their hands. Alzheimer's will convince you that the person suffering from Alzheimer's is not the person you always knew.

Alzheimer's will convince you to conclude over and over that the person suffering from Alzheimer's can't and won't.

I call this conclusion leading to evidence logic.

You conclude they can't, they won't, and then without realizing it you accept only the evidence that supports that conclusion.

Forget about trying new things and working hard and relentlessly to change the way things are. You made up your mind, you have your conclusion. It no longer matters if others are having success and discovering that there is "more there". You wired your brain to believe your patients is somehow different and can't or won't.

Let me ask you, how many times have you been an Alzheimer's caregiver? How much experience do you have with Alzheimer's patients? How do you know something won't work if you never tried it? I don't mean for a day or a week, over and over until you get there.

Did you watch the documentary -- I Remember Better When I Paint? Are you fully familiar with the positive responses that Judy Berry is getting from Alzheimer's patients at the Lakeview Ranch? Have any red plates?

Now to Pamela. Pamela saw the parrot videos. Somehow she at first concluded that the parrot would not work effectively for her mother Audrey. In fact, she concluded that the parrot might make things worse.

There was something going on in her brain. Conclusion? Evidence?

Somehow over time, the evidence won out. Maybe Pamela finally thought, what is the downside to trying? I don't know if she was thinking of the upside.

Congratulations Pamela, you just wrote one of the best articles we have on "More There".

You showed quite effectively that conclusion leading to evidence logic if allowed to persist can be a strategy of failure.

You proved that the time to conclude is after all the evidence is in -- not before.

You proved that if you don't try you can be certain it won't work. You also proved that trying might bring unexpected and wonderful result.

There are seven links to additional information in the article above. I suggest you take the time to read them when you can.





Original content Bob DeMarco, the Alzheimer's Reading Room