Apr 10, 2011

The Day I Learned, I am not Alone

There are millions of us spread across the earth -- Alzheimer’s caregivers. What you need to do is allow your inner self to connect...
By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

It is easy to say, but harder to do. To come to the understanding that you are not alone.

You gain internal strength, courage, and a resolve when you come to the understanding that you are not alone.

Once connected you will begin to draw the strength you need to accomplish your mission.

Are you willing to answer the call?





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Transcript of the podcast

I remember the day when it happened. The day I Learned I was not alone.

It changed my way of thinking and it changed our lives.

I had my mother in tow, taking her to the Silver Sneakers class at the gym.

I took her into the class, helped her to sit in the chair, took out her ball, hand weights, bungee cord and bottle of water. As was common, she refused to look me in the eye or talk. I kissed her on the cheek, said a few words of encouragement, and headed into the gym for my own workout.

As I was about to begin the workout, a woman walked up to me and asked, is that your mother? I answered yes. We then introduced ourselves.

And then the words, flew out of me -- she has Alzheimer’s.

The women looked me in the eye and said, I thought so.

Within a minute or two I was into my vent.

The one single thing that was somehow driving me crazy. My mother wouldn’t stop eating and she was always hungry.

The woman said, hold on, she then called her husband over and introduced him.

I continued to vent non-stop for about ten minutes. The wife and husband looked me right in the eye. They didn’t say a word. They listened. They looked me right in the eyes the entire time, had a smile on their faces, and basically shook their heads in a positive way that indicated they understood.

When I stopped they explained to me-- they had already gone the full round trip ride with Alzheimer’s disease. They told me about their own very similar experience. They offered some advice and encouragement. They answered my questions. This encountered lasted the full 45 minute while mother was in the exercise class.

These two wonderful people smiled at me the entire time. They listened to me. They encouraged me. They had never seen or met me prior to this encounter.

Later that day, once I had my mother situated, I began to pace. This is what I do when I think.

Then it happened. The stress started to come out of me. The thousand pound weight was lifted off my shoulders.

I actually believed, knew and understood for the first time -- I was not Alone.

This was just the beginning. Over time I came to a clear, wonderful, and empowering belief -- I was not alone.

Somehow in a way that is hard to explain, you gain internal strength, courage, and a resolve when you come to the understanding that you are not alone.

Over time, I came to believe that these feelings are more then just an idea. Knowing that you are not alone is one of the first steps to reaching that place deep inside you that often lies dormant. It is a spiritual place. Alzheimer’s caregiving unleashes a heightened sense of the world around you -- you become connected

This heightened sense of connectedness explains in part how sad, frustrated and lonely you can feel when things are not going well. It also explains how you can feel so happy, good about yourself, and empowered when things are going well.

This heightened sense of being comes when you allow yourself to think and feel, it comes when you come to the real understanding that you are not alone.

There are millions of us spread across the earth -- Alzheimer’s caregivers. All you need to do is let your inner self connect to us.

Once connected you will begin to draw the strength you need to accomplish your mission.

Are you willing to answer the call?

My name is Bob DeMarco, I am an Alzheimer’s caregiver. My mother Dorothy, now 94 years old, suffers from Alzheimer’s disease.

We live our life one day at a time.

See ya next time.



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Bob DeMarco is the Founder of the Alzheimer's Reading Room and an Alzheimer's caregiver. The blog contains more than 2,560 articles with more than 412,100 links on the Internet. Bob resides in Delray Beach, FL.


Original content Bob DeMarco, the Alzheimer's Reading Room