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Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Stop Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) with Cranberries


Urinary tract infections are common in women, and even more common in women living with dementia.

Alzheimer's Reading Room

This news spread all over the media late yesterday and today.
"Use of cranberry-containing products appears to be associated with prevention of urinary tract infections in some individuals, according to a study that reviewed the available medical literature and was published by Archives of Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication".
If you are a long term reader of the Alzheimer's Reading Room you already read the science behind these findings in 2010 and 2011.

The bottom line. Cranberry juice, cranberry cocktail, and cranberry pills all help fight against urinary tract infections.

Urinary tract infections are common in women, and even more common in women living with dementia.

In the case of women with dementia it can sometimes be difficult to get them to drink enough cranberry juice or cocktail, or get them to drink enough water with the pills.

Keep this in mind. Almost any legitimate cranberry product will work. Cranberry pie anyone? Hmm, cranberry ice cream would be a good idea.

By the way. If you use the search box on the right hand side of any webpage here, you can access our knowledge base of more than 3,700 articles. For example, if you enter urinary tract infection into the search box, you will be an expert after reading our knowledge based articles.

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Cranberry products associated with prevention of urinary tract infections

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections and adult women are particularly susceptible. Cranberry-containing products have long been used as a "folk remedy" to prevent the condition, according to the study background.

Chih-Hung Wang, M.D., of National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, and colleagues reviewed the available medical literature to reevaluate cranberry-containing products for the prevention of UTI.

"Cranberry-containing products tend to be more effective in women with recurrent UTIs, female populations, children, cranberry juice drinkers, and people using cranberry-containing products more than twice daily," the authors note.

The authors identified 13 trials, including 1,616 individuals, for qualitative analysis and 10 of these trials, including 1,494 individuals, were included in quantitative analysis. The random-effects pooled risk ratio for cranberry users vs. nonusers was 0.62, according to the study results.

"In conclusion, the results of the present meta-analysis support that consumption of cranberry-containing products may protect against UTIs in certain populations. However, because of the substantial heterogeneity across trials, this conclusion should be interpreted with great caution," the authors conclude.
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Original content Bob DeMarco, the Alzheimer's Reading Room