Jul 8, 2012

What Advice Would You Give Reader Sheila?

The repetitive behavior is also particularly frustrating when the behavior is dangerous or troublesome.

Alzheimer's Reading Room

Sheila wrote,
I'm gobbling up all the information I can on Alzheimer's/dementia, and it is so helpful in coping with my husband's behavior. My problem is in carrying some of it out.

I'm aware of the repetitive questions and behaviors; I find the creative response difficult. I've also found that my husband sometimes knows the answer to his question, but he continues repeating it anyway, and this DOES infuriate me.

Can I have some milk?
Sorry, but you drank it all.
Can I have some milk? (x25)
What did I answer before?
I can't have any milk because I drank it all.
(Two minutes later) Can I have some milk?

The repetitive behavior is also particularly frustrating when the behavior is dangerous or troublesome.

Like checking the refrigerator repeatedly and leaving it open. And when the behavior is something he's been warned not to do. Like making toast using already buttered bread. Cooking--he caused fires twice.

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Drinking a quart of flavored coffee creamer, thinking it was milk.

Trying to take hot food out of the microwave; he can't use his left arm.

Getting into the bathtub; he has scalded himself a few times, most importantly, he doesn't know how to get out.

The repetitive behavior is also particularly frustrating when the behavior is dangerous or troublesome.

Like checking the refrigerator repeatedly and leaving it open.

And when the behavior is something he's been warned not to do. Like making toast using already buttered bread. Cooking--he caused fires twice.

Drinking a quart of flavored coffee creamer, thinking it was milk. Trying to take hot food out of the microwave; he can't use his left arm.

Getting into the bathtub; he has scalded himself a few times, most importantly, he doesn't know how to get out.

What advice or insight can you share with Sheila?

Use the comments box below this article.





Original content Bob DeMarco, the Alzheimer's Reading Room