Saturday, October 27, 2012

Medicare “Improvement Standard” Ends, What Does it Mean


As you watch this video you might feel sad, and you might feel like crying. I did. But, I believe if you give it some thought after watching you might conclude that Edith Masterman is courageous.

By Bob DeMarco 
 Alzheimer's Reading Room

I want to start this article by asking you to watch the video below. Edith Masterman has been living alone in a wheelchair assisted home since 1966. She wants to stay home, and she does need some assistance. The healthcare system wanted to put Edith in a nursing home against her wishes.

The Center for Medicare Advocacy and Vermont Legal Aid sued Medicare because of the standard that dictated if a person was not "improving" they could be denied coverage.

This of course would apply to every patient with Alzheimer's or a related dementia.

Right now, it is unclear if dementia caregivers will receive the kinds of services they need that would allow them to keep their loved one at home; rather than, placing them in a nursing home because there is no other viable choice available.

This issue is likely to be resolved soon.


As you watch this video you might feel sad, and you might feel like crying. I did. But, I believe if you give it some thought after watching you might conclude that Edith Masterman is courageous. Just like millions of Alzheimer's caregivers.

There are millions of caregivers that might be able to keep their loved one at home for a longer period of time, or until the end, once this law suit is finalized by the judge and the new standards come into effect.



You can learn more about the lawsuit, the settlement, and find links to all kinds of related information by clicking this link -- Skilled Maintenance Services Can Be Covered by Medicare.


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Original content Bob DeMarco, the Alzheimer's Reading Room