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Jan 9, 2017

Planning for Important End of Life Health Care Decisions

Do you have the necessary legal documents and advance directives in place for end of life care and medical emergencies?


Do you have the necessary legal documents and advance directives in place for end of life care and medical emergencies?

Lately I have been receiving more and more questions about Advance directives and legal documents for end of life care.

Shortly after I came to Delray Beach to take care of Dotty I had all of the necessary documents executed, signed, and notarized.

This included legal documents like a durable power of attorney, designation of health care surrogate, Do Not Resuscitate (DNR), and living will.


How to Get Answers To Your Questions About Alzheimer's and Dementia


By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

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You can take several approaches to these documents. For example, you can hire an attorney to do them for you. Or, you can do what I did, go out on the Internet find what you need, get them completed and executed.

Here is a list of the some of the documents you need, or might need.

1. Durable Power of Attorney for Finances gives someone called a trustee the power to make legal and financial decisions for the person with Alzheimer's dementia.


2. Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care gives someone called a proxy the power to make health care decisions for the person with Alzheimer's dementia.


3. Living Will states the person’s wishes for health care at the end of life.


4. Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) this form tells health care staff how the person wants end-of-life health care managed.

Will tells how the person wants his or her property and money to be divided among those left behind.

5. Living Trust tells someone called a trustee how to distribute a person’s property and money


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You can contact your State Attorney Generals' Office to obtain help and advice.

Thanks to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and Caring Connections you can get all or most of the documents you need on one website.

Importantly, the documents are tailor made for each state.


Download Your State's Advance Directives

Alabama
Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

You should have all of these documents executed and available long before you need them.

Carole Larkin had a very good suggestion. Put a copy in the glove compartment of your car just in case you need them in an emergency situation.


Original content the Alzheimer's Reading Room

A Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care is a document that lets you name someone else to make decisions about your health care in case you are not able to make those decisions yourself. It gives that person (called your agent) instructions about the kinds of medical treatment you want.
Source Law Help


A durable power of attorney is essential because if a person becomes incapacitated or incompetent without preparing this document, family and friends will not be allowed to make many important financial decisions, pay bills or make important healthcare decisions on behalf of their parent.
Source Aging Care


Living Will. A written statement detailing a person's desires regarding their medical treatment in circumstances in which they are no longer able to express informed consent, especially an advance directive.


Do Not Resuscitate (DNR). A do-not-resuscitate order, or DNR order, is a medical order written by a doctor. It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if a patient's breathing stops or if the patient's heart stops beating.
A DNR order is created, or set up, before an emergency occurs. A DNR order allows you to choose whether or not you want CPR in an emergency. It is specific about CPR. It does not have instructions for other treatments, such as pain medicine, other medicines, or nutrition.
The doctor writes the order only after talking about it with the patient (if possible), the proxy, or the patient's family.
Source MedlinePlus


Living Trust. A living trust (sometimes called an "inter vivos" or "revocable" trust) is a written legal document through which your assets are placed into a trust for your benefit during your lifetime and then transferred to designated beneficiaries at your death by your chosen representative, called a "successor trustee."
Source Legal Zoom