Feb 6, 2016

Phone Support for Alzheimer's and Dementia Caregivers



Vision – My goal is to help caregivers find answers and solutions to their detailed, dementia-related questions.

I'll draw on my years of hands on experience to help you solve problems, and communicate more effectively with you loved one living with dementia.

We will accomplish our mission via telephone. This allows us to schedule the call at your convenience, and when necessary.

Custom Search - How to Get Answers To Your Questions About Alzheimer's and Dementia




By Rachael Wonderlin
Dementia by Day

Live Consultation for Alzheimer's and Dementia Caregivers and Professionals


Mission – The call is an hour long discussion based around questions that caregivers have about their own loved ones with dementia. I find that many people have specific behavioral problems that they are dealing with, and they need specific, detailed problem-solving advice.

Goal – By the end of the call, caregivers will have a number of tactics and potential solutions to their dementia-related behavior questions. I will send a follow-up email after the call that details everything we discussed, so caregivers don’t need to take notes or try to remember every piece of information.

Education and Experience

My book, “When Someone You Know Lives in a Dementia Care Community” will be coming out this fall with Johns Hopkins University Press.

I have a Master’s in Gerontology from UNC Greensboro and a decade’s worth of experience working with older adults, particularly people with dementia.

The Call Service

The call is only $25 and we can talk on the phone at your earliest convenience.

Go to this page to learn more and schedule a live consultation with Rachael.

Live Consultation for Alzheimer's and Dementia Caregivers and Professionals


Custom Search - Rachael Wonderlin

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Background

When I tell people that I work in dementia care, they usually have a lot of questions. One of the questions that sticks with me is, “Isn’t that depressing, though?” I feel like I’ve practiced my answer, but I always stumble as the words come out. “It’s my favorite thing,” I usually say. That is true.

Dementia care is my favorite thing. It is always awkward to say to families, though, who are often tired and feeling guilty by the time they choose a long-term care community for their loved one’s care. Still, I would not want to be doing anything else with my life, despite how exhausting and emotionally trying it is at times. It’s my calling.

Every single one of the residents I have met is different. They have different backgrounds, different experiences, different personalities, and different goals. But they are all people with basic needs, wants, and drives that get them through the day.

My favorite thing about caring for people with dementia is being a problem-solver. Many of the residents I have cared for cannot voice what exactly they want or need. Instead, they need someone to figure that out for them.

In light of this, and in response to all of the great questions I’ve gotten over the years, I have established a new program. It’s a phone call program, where readers of my blog (and new guests) can call me and ask me questions about dementia care. I think this is particularly helpful for people caring for a loved one with dementia.

The hour-long call is only $25, payable ahead of time. Callers set up a time and date to talk to me, and I give them a call. I do my best to solve their problems and answer their questions. Then, after the call, I send them some follow-up notes. My program has gotten a really great response thus far, and I want to keep growing it.

If you have a call with me, and find it helpful, please refer a friend! When that friend calls me, and gives me your name, you’ll get a second call with me for free.

Here is the link to my site where I explain the call program in more detail.
http://www.dementia-by-day.com/live-call

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