Apr 13, 2017

13 Things Every Alzheimer's Caregiver Needs to Know

The biggest challenge we face as Alzheimer's caregivers is learning how to understand, cope, and communication with a person living with dementia.


Tips on Alzheimer's Care, Memory Care, and Dementia Care
By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room

The task of caring for a person living with dementia is often overwhelming.

I took care of my mom, Dotty, for eight and a half years, 3,112 days, so I know how you feel. I understand how you feel.


The articles below offer solutions to some of the problems we face each day. They have been tested over time by thousands of caregivers and they work. Most times it takes a little practice and a lot of patience. Some work immediately, while other solutions take some time to start working. Don't allow yourself to get frustrated.

Subscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading Room
Email:


1. Communicating in Alzheimer's World

In order to begin the process of dealing with communication in a world filled with Alzheimer's you first need to make a simple important decision - you want to decrease both your stress as caregiver, and the stress of the person living with Alzheimer's disease.




2. The Importance of Touch and Kindness in Dementia Care

One of the biggest challenges Alzheimer's Caregivers face is how to communicate effectively with someone living with Alzheimer's disease. This challenge is particularly difficult when a person living with dementia becomes nasty and mean.


3. Death by Complications from Alzheimer's, What does this mean?

Some people might think or believe that Alzheimer's causes brain death. In other words, it causes the complete brain to stop functioning. This is not what usually happens. Most people die from complications caused by Alzheimer's disease.


4. 5 Tips, How to get an Alzheimer's Patient to Shower
Getting a person living with Alzheimer's or dementia to take a shower or bath is one of the most common problems we face as caregivers.

How to Get a Dementia Patient to Do What You Want Them to Do


5. An Undetected Urinary Tract Infection Can Kill an Alzheimer's Patient

Urinary tract infections can be the "bane" of our existence as caregivers of people living with dementia. Almost every caregiver I know will tell you "they suffered" enormous stress and anxiety as a result of an undetected UTI. One of leading causes of death in Alzheimer's patients is infection.


6. The Effect of Emotional Super Glue in Alzheimer's Care

The person living with dementia bonds to you. It is emotionally painful for a person living with dementia to be "without you". Persons living with dementia have an enormous amount of emotional super glue. This should make you feel good about yourself; and, you can use this to your advantage.




7. Alzheimer's Tries to Kill Everyone It Touches

Alzheimer's destroys family relationships. Alzheimer's causes family and friends to abandon not only the person living with Alzheimer's but also their Caregiver. Alzheimer's tries to kill not only the person living with dementia, it tries to kill relationships and drive the caregiver into a state of depression.


8. 16 Ways to Get a Dementia Patient to Eat More Food

The First Question I Always Ask is - What Color are Your Plates? Trying to explain why they need to eat is counter productive. In order to succeed you need the right tools; and then, learn how to be a guide.




9. Are Alzheimer's Caregivers the Forgotten?

It is not unusual for caregivers to tell me that as time goes on, and as Alzheimer's worsens, one by one their family and friends fade away.


10. 10 Tips for Communicating with an Alzheimer's Patient

Ever feel like your loved one is ignoring you or that you just weren’t getting through to your loved one? Try some of these tips to see if they help.


11. An Alzheimer's Communication Tip - No More Blah Blah Blah

Learning how to communicate effectively with a person living with dementia requires change. How hard it is to change the way you have been doing things with a person you have known all of your life? Hard!




12. Dementia Patients Can Deceive Others to the Distress of Their Caregiver

This is one the things that can drive caregivers crazy. You loved is hard to deal with and sometimes mean. You tell everyone that will listen about this. Then someone comes to visit or you take them someplace and they are all of sudden - normal. What can you do to make this work in your favor?


13. 6 reasons why you might have to put someone with dementia in a memory care facility or nursing home

Should I put my loved with dementia in a nursing home or memory care facility? We all face this gut wrenching decision. Most of us don't want to do it. But sometimes, it is the only decision, and only right decision.


How to Get Answers To Your Questions About Alzheimer's and Dementia

Related Articles

Care of dementia patients at home

Connect Alzheimer's Dementia

The Importance of the Daily Routine in Dementia Care

How to deal with challenging dementia patients

Understanding Dementia Patient Meanness

"The Alzheimer’s Reading Room is what it claims to be – and more.
This comprehensive site is run by full-time caregiver and gifted advocate Bob DeMarco.
 
Filled with wonderful contributions from a variety of talented writers, this site offers everything you need to know about the challenge of caregiving, learning about your loved one’s condition, and taking care of yourself as well. 
Thanks to the tireless efforts of everyone at the Alzheimer’s Reading Room, you have a go-to place for advice, education, and an occasional laugh. Stop by, and start feeling empowered to handle life as a caregiver." 
~ Healthline

Bob DeMarco is the Founder of the Alzheimer's Reading Room (ARR). Bob is a recognized expert, writer, speaker, and influencer in the Alzheimer's and Dementia Community worldwide. The Alzheimer's Reading Room contains more than 5,000 articles and has been published daily since July, 2009.

You are reading original content Alzheimer's Reading Room

http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2017/01/dementia-care-13-things-every-alzheimers-caregiver.html